An Ultra Orthodox Jewish man inspect cit : News Photo

An Ultra Orthodox Jewish man inspect cit

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AFP / Stringer
An Ultra Orthodox Jewish man inspect citrons, or etrog in Hebrew, one of the four species which are used during the celebration of Sukkot, the feast of the Tabernacles, in the religious city of Bnei Brak on September 30, 2009. Beside the �etrog�, the three other species are the 'hadass' (myrtle), 'aravah' (willow), and 'lulav' (date palm frond) all of which are used in a waving ritual during Sukkot or the Feast of the Tabernacles. The seven-day holiday of Sukkot recalls the 40 years during which the ancient Israelites wandered the desert living in huts following the exodus from Egypt. The fruit is usually harvested when still green, but to be considered kosher and able to be used in the Sukkot rituals the etrog must show signs of ripening. AFP PHOTO/YEHUDA RAIZNER (Photo credit should read YEHUDA RAIZNER/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
An Ultra Orthodox Jewish man inspect citrons, or etrog in Hebrew, one of the four species which are used during the celebration of Sukkot, the feast of the Tabernacles, in the religious city of Bnei Brak on September 30, 2009. Beside the �etrog�, the three other species are the 'hadass' (myrtle), 'aravah' (willow), and 'lulav' (date palm frond) all of which are used in a waving ritual during Sukkot or the Feast of the Tabernacles. The seven-day holiday of Sukkot recalls the 40 years during which the ancient Israelites wandered the desert living in huts following the exodus from Egypt. The fruit is usually harvested when still green, but to be considered kosher and able to be used in the Sukkot rituals the etrog must show signs of ripening. AFP PHOTO/YEHUDA RAIZNER (Photo credit should read YEHUDA RAIZNER/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
September 30, 2009
Editorial #:
91298948
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AFP
Max file size:
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Source:
AFP
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AFP
Object name:
DV586722

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An Ultra Orthodox Jewish man inspect citrons or etrog in Hebrew one... News Photo 91298948Adult,Banquet,Bnei Brak,Celebration,Citron,City,Examining,Horizontal,Israel,Judaism,Men,Religion,Species,Sukkoth Festival,Ultra Orthodox JudaismPhotographer Collection: AFP 2009 AFPAn Ultra Orthodox Jewish man inspect citrons, or etrog in Hebrew, one of the four species which are used during the celebration of Sukkot, the feast of the Tabernacles, in the religious city of Bnei Brak on September 30, 2009. Beside the �etrog�, the three other species are the 'hadass' (myrtle), 'aravah' (willow), and 'lulav' (date palm frond) all of which are used in a waving ritual during Sukkot or the Feast of the Tabernacles. The seven-day holiday of Sukkot recalls the 40 years during which the ancient Israelites wandered the desert living in huts following the exodus from Egypt. The fruit is usually harvested when still green, but to be considered kosher and able to be used in the Sukkot rituals the etrog must show signs of ripening. AFP PHOTO/YEHUDA RAIZNER (Photo credit should read YEHUDA RAIZNER/AFP/Getty Images)